• LEPolitics

    Meetings every other Tuesday from 2:30 until 3 in room 313 

    Image result for donkey and elephant represent in politics

    We hope to bring a type of group to the school that may seem controversial at first, but we feel that a club of this nature is growing more and more necessary each and every day.  Nowadays, the country is becoming divided, and both sides are unwilling to sit down and have an honest dialogue with the opposing side.  Debate and conversation are the only ways a solution will be found.  We had the idea that if high school students are educated and learn about issues when they are younger, they will grow to be more intellectually diverse and tolerant of viewpoints other than their own.  Here’s how we plan to do it:

    We have one club, which will be sponsored by one teacher/faculty member.  This sponsor must be impartial and bipartisan, for they will be the one to moderate and facilitate debates between students.  Once the club is formed, students will then learn the viewpoints of both major parties.  The students will then determine, on their own, which party they belong to.  We will then break off into sides, left and right, which is where the education of the issues begin.

    There will be 4 days of debate, scheduled by the moderator (sponsor), which will contain four topics of discussion, each receiving their own 45 minute period of debate. The 45 minutes will be broken down as follows:

    • Two 2.5 minute opening statements
    • 20 minute Q&A session, with questions being asked by audience/moderator
    • 20 minutes of crossfire, AKA open debate
    • Move on to next topic.

    The debaters will be chosen depending on their topic, nominated by their own party.  For example:

    Paul is an expert on gun control, Gene is heavily informed in climate change, and Ace is a professional on capitalism.  They are voted for by their party, and then they will represent their side during the debate.  

    If Gene was an expert in both climate change and guns, he can also be nominated to participate in both debates.

    Goals

    1. To encourage civilized and peaceful debate.
    2. To learn to construct solid arguments for supporting one’s claims, citing accurate and unbiased sources.
    3. To encourage the next generation of voters to be informed and understand both sides.

    Conclusion

    The purpose of these debates is not to destroy the opposing side, but to bring out the best arguments to support each side’s claims.  Then letting the audience construct their own views based on what they’ve seen in the debate.  We hope that this will become big enough that kids that aren’t in the club will come watch debates in order to gain more information on the issues that will concern us in the future.

    Topics

    • Modern Day Feminism: Has it gone too far?
    • Capital Punishment: Is it moral?
    • Terrorism: How do we stop it?
    • Abortion: Woman’s or child’s right?
    • LGBT Issues: How should we proceed?
    • Race Relations: Is their systemic racism throughout the country?
    • Gun Control: More strict or loose gun laws?
    • Climate Change: Man-made or natural?
    • Immigration: How should we react to undocumented/illegal immigrants?
    • Capitalism vs Socialism: Which is more beneficial?
    • Healthcare/Health Insurance: Is it a right or good?
    • Marijuana: Legal or not?
    • Government Aid: More or less?
    • Minimum Wage: Higher or lower?
    • Education: Should it be free?
    • Energy Sources: Alternative or same that we have now?